Teacher,
access this and thousands of other lesson plans!

At Teachy you can access thousands of questions, create assignments, lesson plans, and projects.

Free Sign Up

Lesson plan of Benjamin Franklin

Objectives (5 - 7 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Introduce the topic of Benjamin Franklin, an influential figure in American history, emphasizing his role as a statesman, scientist, inventor, and writer.

  2. Outline the primary objectives of the lesson, which are:

    • To understand the significant contributions of Benjamin Franklin in shaping the American nation.

    • To explore Franklin's role as a polymath and his contributions to science, literature, and invention.

    • To analyze Franklin's life and work and draw connections to broader historical and societal contexts.

  3. Explain the hands-on nature of the lesson, where students will be engaged in various activities that foster understanding and critical thinking about Benjamin Franklin's life and contributions.

  4. Briefly touch on the lesson plan, explaining that the session will involve group work, experiments, and discussions, and what they will be expected to achieve by the end of the class.

  5. Encourage students to actively participate in the lesson, asking questions, and sharing their thoughts and ideas throughout the session.

Introduction (10 - 12 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Prompt the students to think about the concept of a polymath, a person who has expert knowledge in several different areas. The teacher can ask: "Can you think of any famous people who were polymaths, meaning they excelled in multiple fields such as science, literature, and invention?" This will serve as a bridge to the introduction of the lesson's central figure, Benjamin Franklin, a renowned polymath in American history.

  2. Recap the previous lessons related to the American Revolution, emphasizing the role of key figures like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. The teacher can ask: "What do you remember about the American Revolution and the Founding Fathers?" This will help students to contextualize Franklin's role in shaping the nation and his contributions.

  3. Present two problem situations to pique students' interest. The first problem could be related to electricity, asking: "Can you imagine a world without electricity?" The second problem could be related to postal services, asking: "How do you think mail was delivered before the invention of the postal system as we know it today?" These problems will be solved through the exploration of Franklin's inventions and contributions.

  4. Contextualize the importance of the subject by relating it to real-world applications. The teacher can explain that understanding Franklin's life and work can provide insights into the process of innovation, the importance of curiosity, and the role of individuals in shaping society and history.

  5. Introduce Benjamin Franklin and highlight some intriguing facts to capture students' attention. The teacher can share the following information:

    • Franklin was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a key figure in drafting the Declaration of Independence.

    • He was a self-taught scientist and inventor, famous for his experiments with electricity and the invention of the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove.

    • Franklin was also a well-known writer, and his famous works include 'Poor Richard's Almanack' and 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.

By the end of the introduction, students should have a clear understanding of the lesson's objectives, they should be curious and engaged, and they should be ready to delve deeper into the life and work of Benjamin Franklin.

Development (25 - 30 minutes)

Activity 1: Benjamin Franklin's Almanac (10 - 12 minutes)

  1. The teacher will divide the class into groups of 4 or 5 students. Each group will be provided with a list of quotes from Benjamin Franklin's 'Poor Richard's Almanack'.

  2. The teacher will then explain that 'Poor Richard's Almanack' was a yearly almanac published by Franklin under the pseudonym Richard Saunders from 1732 to 1758. These almanacs contained weather information, household tips, and a series of proverbs that Franklin used to convey his practical wisdom and insights on life.

  3. Each group will be assigned a few quotes from the almanac. The groups will be tasked with analyzing the quotes, discussing their possible meanings, and interpreting how they reflect Franklin's character and beliefs.

  4. After the groups have had time to discuss their assigned quotes, the teacher will facilitate a class discussion. Each group will share their assigned quotes and their interpretations, leading to a broader conversation about Franklin's character and his role as a philosopher.

  5. The teacher will then transition the discussion towards how Franklin's philosophical beliefs might have influenced his role as a statesman, scientist, and inventor.

Activity 2: Kite Experiment (10 - 12 minutes)

  1. The teacher will explain the famous kite experiment conducted by Franklin in 1752. Emphasize the intent of the experiment was to prove that lightning was electricity.

  2. Each group will be provided with materials necessary for a simplified version of the experiment: a small kite made out of a plastic bag, a string, and a small key.

  3. The teacher will guide the students in setting up the kite experiment, ensuring safety precautions are in place. Students will be asked to predict what they think will happen when the kite is flown in stormy weather.

  4. Following the setup, the teacher will guide students to fly the kite in a manner that allows it to come into contact with an electrical source (e.g., an electrical power line). The teacher will then ask students to observe and record any changes they see.

  5. After the experiment, each group will be given time to discuss their observations and draw conclusions. The teacher will then facilitate a class discussion where students share their observations and conclusions, comparing them to Franklin's original experiment.

Activity 3: Franklin's Inventions (5 - 6 minutes)

  1. The teacher will ask students to reflect on the importance of Franklin's inventions in their daily lives.

  2. Each group will be given a list of Franklin's inventions, such as the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove.

  3. The groups will discuss and make a list of these inventions that they believe have had the most significant impact on society. They will also note any specific ways these inventions have influenced their own lives.

  4. After the discussion, each group will share their list with the class, and the teacher will lead a discussion about the students' choices and their reasoning.

By the end of the development stage, students should have a deeper understanding of Franklin's life and work, and they should be able to draw connections between his contributions and their own lives and society at large. The hands-on activities should have provided a fun and engaging way for students to interact with the material and deepen their learning.

Feedback (8 - 10 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Facilitate a group discussion where each group shares their main findings or conclusions from the activities. Each group will have up to 3 minutes to present, ensuring that the discussion remains focused and within the time limit. This will allow students to learn from each other's perspectives and insights.

  2. Connect the group's findings to the broader context of Benjamin Franklin's life and work. The teacher will highlight how the activities link to Franklin's role as a statesman, scientist, inventor, and writer, and how his contributions have shaped American society and history.

  3. Encourage students to reflect on the day's activities. The teacher can ask questions such as:

    • "What was the most important concept you learned today?"

    • "Which of Benjamin Franklin's contributions do you find most remarkable and why?"

    • "How do you think Franklin's philosophy of practical wisdom has influenced his scientific and inventing pursuits?"

    • "Can you think of any modern-day polymaths who are making significant contributions in multiple fields?"

  4. Provide students with a minute or two to think about these questions and share their thoughts. This reflection time will help consolidate their learning and internalize the key concepts.

  5. Facilitate a whole-class discussion where students share their reflections. The teacher will also share their own reflections on the day's lesson, reinforcing the key points and addressing any misconceptions.

  6. Conclude the feedback session by summarizing the key learning points from the lesson. The teacher will also explain how the lesson's activities and discussions have helped to deepen students' understanding of Benjamin Franklin's life and contributions.

By the end of the feedback stage, students should have a clear understanding of the day's lesson, be able to articulate their thoughts on the subject matter, and have a deeper appreciation for Benjamin Franklin's significance in American history. The teacher should also have a good sense of the students' learning progress and be able to identify any areas that may require further clarification or reinforcement in future lessons.

Conclusion (5 - 7 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Summarize and Recap the Lesson:

    • The teacher will recap the main points of the lesson, emphasizing Benjamin Franklin's multifaceted contributions as a statesman, scientist, inventor, and writer.
    • The teacher will remind students of the activities they engaged in, such as analyzing quotes from 'Poor Richard's Almanack', conducting a simplified version of Franklin's kite experiment, and discussing his inventions.
    • The teacher will also recap the key insights gained from the activities, such as Franklin's practical wisdom, his curiosity and love for learning, and his significant contributions to society and history.
  2. Connection to Theory and Practice:

    • The teacher will explain how the lesson connected theoretical knowledge with practical applications. For instance, students learned about Franklin's philosophical beliefs through analyzing his quotes, and they understood the scientific method through the kite experiment.
    • The teacher will also highlight how the lesson fostered critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as students had to interpret quotes, make predictions for the kite experiment, and assess the impact of Franklin's inventions.
  3. Suggested Additional Materials:

    • The teacher will recommend additional resources for students interested in learning more about Benjamin Franklin. These resources can include biographies, documentaries, and interactive websites.
    • The teacher will also suggest that students explore Franklin's other inventions, beyond the ones discussed in class, and his role in the formation of the U.S. Constitution and the American Philosophical Society.
  4. Importance of the Topic for Everyday Life:

    • Finally, the teacher will explain the relevance of Benjamin Franklin's life and work to students' everyday lives. The teacher will stress that Franklin's example of a lifelong learner and a problem solver can inspire students in their own academic and personal pursuits.
    • The teacher will also highlight the significance of Franklin's inventions, such as the lightning rod and bifocals, in modern life, and how his contributions to the postal system have influenced global communication and commerce.

By the end of the conclusion, students should have a comprehensive understanding of Benjamin Franklin's life and work, feel motivated to further explore the topic, and recognize the relevance of Franklin's contributions in their own lives and the world around them.

Do you wish to have access to all lesson plans? Register at Teachy!

Liked the Lesson Plan? See others related:

Discipline logo

History

Hellenistic Greece

Objectives (5 - 7 minutes)

  1. Understand the timeline of Hellenistic Greece and its significance in the broader context of Ancient Greece.
  2. Identify and describe the social, cultural, and political developments that occurred during the Hellenistic period.
  3. Analyze the impact of Hellenistic Greece on the world, including art, science, and philosophy.

Secondary Objectives:

  1. Develop critical thinking skills by comparing and contrasting Hellenistic Greece with other periods of Ancient Greece.
  2. Enhance communication skills through class discussions and group activities.
  3. Encourage independent research and learning through the use of digital resources.

Introduction (10 - 12 minutes)

  1. Review of Prior Knowledge: The teacher begins the lesson by briefly recapping the previous lessons on Ancient Greece, focusing on the Classical period, its key figures, and significant events. The teacher may use a timeline display, a quick quiz, or a discussion to refresh students' memory and ensure they have the necessary background knowledge for the upcoming lesson.

  2. Problem Situations:

    • The teacher presents the students with a hypothetical situation: "Imagine you're an artist in Ancient Greece, and suddenly the city-states have fallen under the rule of a foreign power. How do you think your art would change? What influences might you incorporate from the new ruling power?" This situation introduces the idea of cultural change and artistic influences during the Hellenistic period.
    • Another scenario could be: "You're a philosopher in Ancient Greece, and a great library has just been established in Alexandria, Egypt. How might this impact your work and the spread of your ideas?" This situation highlights the importance of the Library of Alexandria and the spread of knowledge during the Hellenistic period.
  3. Contextualization of the Topic:

    • The teacher emphasizes the enduring impact of Hellenistic Greece, explaining how many of the ideas, art forms, and scientific discoveries from this period continue to shape our world today. For instance, the teacher could mention that the scientific method, geometry, and many philosophical ideas originated during this period.
    • The teacher also highlights the geographical area covered by Hellenistic Greece, including parts of modern-day Greece, Egypt, Turkey, and Iran, to provide a sense of the vastness and diversity of this period.
  4. Introduction of the Topic:

    • The teacher introduces the term "Hellenistic Greece" and explains that it refers to the period following the conquests of Alexander the Great, from around 323 BCE to 31 BCE.
    • To engage the students' interest, the teacher shares a fascinating fact: "Did you know that during the Hellenistic period, the city of Alexandria in Egypt became the world's foremost center of learning and knowledge, with its famous library housing over 400,000 scrolls? That's more than the largest libraries in the world today!"
    • The teacher may also show a few images of Hellenistic art, such as the Winged Victory of Samothrace or the Laocoön and His Sons, to spark the students' curiosity and give them a visual impression of the distinct style of this period.

Development

Pre-Class Activities (15 - 20 minutes)

Students are assigned the following tasks to complete before the class session:

  1. Reading and Note-taking: Students are provided with online articles and book chapters about Hellenistic Greece. They are asked to read and take notes on significant events, key figures, societal changes, and cultural developments during this period. Encourage students to highlight and summarize important points in their own words.

  2. Video Watching and Reflection: Students are to watch a short, engaging video (such as a documentary clip or an animated educational video) on Hellenistic Greece. Afterward, they are asked to write a brief reflection on what they learned. Prompts for the reflection may include: "What surprised you the most about Hellenistic Greece?" and "How did the new knowledge change your understanding of the period?"

  3. Map Activity: Students are given a blank map of the Mediterranean region and are asked to locate and label key cities and regions during the Hellenistic period, including Athens, Sparta, Alexandria, and more. This activity helps students visualize the extent of Hellenistic Greece's influence.

In-Class Activities (25 - 30 minutes)

  1. Activity 1: "Conquer the World!" Game

    • The teacher divides the students into groups and gives each group a map of the ancient world during the Hellenistic period, a list of locations, and an overview of the major events during this era.

    • The goal of the game is to conquer as many territories as possible by answering questions correctly about Hellenistic Greece (e.g., "Name one Hellenistic city founded by Alexander the Great." or "What was the role of the Library of Alexandria in spreading knowledge during this period?").

    • Each group takes turns answering a question. If they are correct, they can "conquer" the location on their map. The team with the most territories at the end of the game wins.

    • This game encourages teamwork, critical thinking, and reinforces the students' understanding of the geographic and historical aspects of the Hellenistic period.

  2. Activity 2: "Artistic Transformation" Collage

    • The teacher provides each group with a collection of images of Greek art from different periods, including Classical and Hellenistic.

    • The groups are tasked to create a collage that represents the transition from Classical to Hellenistic art. They must identify and incorporate elements that changed or were influenced during this time.

    • Once the collages are complete, each group presents their work to the class, explaining the changes they noticed and the reasons behind their choices.

    • This activity promotes visual analysis, comparative thinking, and creativity while reinforcing the knowledge of the cultural shifts during the Hellenistic period.

  3. Activity 3: "Philosopher's Café" Debate

    • The teacher facilitates a "Philosopher's Café" debate, where students discuss and debate philosophical ideas that emerged during Hellenistic Greece.

    • The class is divided into two teams, representing two different philosophical schools (e.g., Stoicism and Epicureanism). Each team is given time to prepare their arguments for and against a specific philosophical statement.

    • Then, each team presents their arguments, and the debate is opened for rebuttals and counterarguments. The teacher moderates the discussion, ensuring that all students have a chance to participate and that the debate remains respectful and focused.

    • This debate activity not only helps students understand the philosophical ideas of the Hellenistic period but also improves their research, critical thinking, and public speaking skills.

All three activities are interactive, student-centered, and designed to reinforce the students' understanding of the Hellenistic period from different angles. They foster collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and communication skills. The teacher moves between groups, offering guidance, answering questions, and facilitating discussions as necessary.

Feedback (10 - 12 minutes)

  1. Group Discussion and Sharing (4 - 5 minutes):

    • The teacher brings all students back together for a group discussion. Each group is given up to 3 minutes to share their solutions, conclusions, or ongoing thoughts from the activities. The teacher encourages each group to highlight the most important point they learned during the activities.
    • The teacher facilitates the discussion by summarizing each group's findings and linking them back to the theory. The teacher also clarifies any misconceptions and ensures that all key points have been covered.
  2. Connecting Theory and Practice (2 - 3 minutes):

    • The teacher then explains how the group activities connect with the theory of Hellenistic Greece. For example, the teacher could highlight how the "Conquer the World!" game helped students understand the geographical extent of Hellenistic Greece and the impact of Alexander the Great's conquests.
    • The teacher could also point out how the "Artistic Transformation" collage activity illustrated the cultural changes during the Hellenistic period, and how the "Philosopher's Café" debate allowed students to delve into the philosophical ideas of the time.
  3. Reflection (4 - 5 minutes):

    • Finally, the teacher encourages students to reflect on their learning experience. The teacher could ask students to write down their answers to questions such as:
      1. What was the most important concept you learned today?
      2. What questions remain unanswered?
      3. How has your understanding of Hellenistic Greece changed from the beginning of the lesson?
    • Alternatively, the teacher could conduct a quick round of verbal reflections, where each student shares their answers to these questions with the class. This activity helps students consolidate their learning and identify areas where they might need further clarification or study.

This feedback stage is crucial for consolidating the students' learning, clarifying any doubts, and promoting self-reflection. It ensures that the students have understood the key concepts of the lesson and have had the opportunity to apply their knowledge in a creative and engaging way. The teacher's facilitation and guidance during this stage are essential for making the most of the students' learning experience.

Conclusion (5 - 7 minutes)

  1. Summary and Recap (2 - 3 minutes):

    • The teacher wraps up the lesson by summarizing the main points covered during the class. This includes the definition and timeline of Hellenistic Greece, the significant social, cultural, and political developments, and the impact of this period on the world's art, science, and philosophy.
    • The teacher refers back to the objectives of the lesson and assesses whether they have been achieved. The teacher may use visual aids, such as a timeline or a mind map, to help students visualize the connections between different parts of the lesson.
  2. Connecting Theory, Practice, and Applications (1 - 2 minutes):

    • The teacher explains how the lesson connected theory, practice, and real-world applications. For example, the pre-class activities of reading, watching videos, and completing the map activity provided the theoretical knowledge, while the in-class activities of the "Conquer the World!" game, "Artistic Transformation" collage, and "Philosopher's Café" debate allowed students to apply this knowledge in a fun and engaging way.
    • The teacher also highlights the real-world applications of the lesson, such as understanding how cultural and societal changes can influence art, philosophy, and science. The teacher could also mention how the skill of critical thinking, developed through these activities, is valuable in various aspects of life, from problem-solving to decision-making.
  3. Additional Resources (1 - 2 minutes):

    • The teacher suggests additional resources for students who wish to explore the topic further. These could include books, documentaries, websites, or museum exhibitions related to Hellenistic Greece. For instance, the teacher could recommend the book "The Hellenistic Age: A Short History" by Peter Green, or the documentary "The Greeks: Crucible of Civilization" by PBS.
    • The teacher could also suggest a visit to a local museum with a Hellenistic art collection or provide links to online museum resources. These additional resources not only enrich the students' understanding of the topic but also foster their curiosity and love for learning.
  4. Relevance to Everyday Life (1 minute):

    • Lastly, the teacher briefly explains the relevance of the lesson to everyday life. For example, the teacher could mention that many concepts and ideas from Hellenistic Greece continue to shape our world today, such as the scientific method, democratic governance, and the concept of individualism. The teacher could also point out that the cultural and societal changes during this period reflect the ongoing evolution of human societies, and understanding these changes can help us make sense of the world around us.
    • The teacher concludes the lesson by thanking the students for their active participation and encouraging them to continue exploring and learning about Hellenistic Greece and other fascinating periods in history.

This conclusion stage serves to consolidate the students' learning, make the connections between the lesson and the real world, and inspire further exploration of the topic. It also provides closure to the lesson, leaving the students with a clear understanding of what they have learned and why it is important.

See more
Discipline logo

History

Benjamin Franklin

Objectives (5 - 7 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Introduce the topic of Benjamin Franklin, an influential figure in American history, emphasizing his role as a statesman, scientist, inventor, and writer.

  2. Outline the primary objectives of the lesson, which are:

    • To understand the significant contributions of Benjamin Franklin in shaping the American nation.

    • To explore Franklin's role as a polymath and his contributions to science, literature, and invention.

    • To analyze Franklin's life and work and draw connections to broader historical and societal contexts.

  3. Explain the hands-on nature of the lesson, where students will be engaged in various activities that foster understanding and critical thinking about Benjamin Franklin's life and contributions.

  4. Briefly touch on the lesson plan, explaining that the session will involve group work, experiments, and discussions, and what they will be expected to achieve by the end of the class.

  5. Encourage students to actively participate in the lesson, asking questions, and sharing their thoughts and ideas throughout the session.

Introduction (10 - 12 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Prompt the students to think about the concept of a polymath, a person who has expert knowledge in several different areas. The teacher can ask: "Can you think of any famous people who were polymaths, meaning they excelled in multiple fields such as science, literature, and invention?" This will serve as a bridge to the introduction of the lesson's central figure, Benjamin Franklin, a renowned polymath in American history.

  2. Recap the previous lessons related to the American Revolution, emphasizing the role of key figures like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. The teacher can ask: "What do you remember about the American Revolution and the Founding Fathers?" This will help students to contextualize Franklin's role in shaping the nation and his contributions.

  3. Present two problem situations to pique students' interest. The first problem could be related to electricity, asking: "Can you imagine a world without electricity?" The second problem could be related to postal services, asking: "How do you think mail was delivered before the invention of the postal system as we know it today?" These problems will be solved through the exploration of Franklin's inventions and contributions.

  4. Contextualize the importance of the subject by relating it to real-world applications. The teacher can explain that understanding Franklin's life and work can provide insights into the process of innovation, the importance of curiosity, and the role of individuals in shaping society and history.

  5. Introduce Benjamin Franklin and highlight some intriguing facts to capture students' attention. The teacher can share the following information:

    • Franklin was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a key figure in drafting the Declaration of Independence.

    • He was a self-taught scientist and inventor, famous for his experiments with electricity and the invention of the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove.

    • Franklin was also a well-known writer, and his famous works include 'Poor Richard's Almanack' and 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.

By the end of the introduction, students should have a clear understanding of the lesson's objectives, they should be curious and engaged, and they should be ready to delve deeper into the life and work of Benjamin Franklin.

Development (25 - 30 minutes)

Activity 1: Benjamin Franklin's Almanac (10 - 12 minutes)

  1. The teacher will divide the class into groups of 4 or 5 students. Each group will be provided with a list of quotes from Benjamin Franklin's 'Poor Richard's Almanack'.

  2. The teacher will then explain that 'Poor Richard's Almanack' was a yearly almanac published by Franklin under the pseudonym Richard Saunders from 1732 to 1758. These almanacs contained weather information, household tips, and a series of proverbs that Franklin used to convey his practical wisdom and insights on life.

  3. Each group will be assigned a few quotes from the almanac. The groups will be tasked with analyzing the quotes, discussing their possible meanings, and interpreting how they reflect Franklin's character and beliefs.

  4. After the groups have had time to discuss their assigned quotes, the teacher will facilitate a class discussion. Each group will share their assigned quotes and their interpretations, leading to a broader conversation about Franklin's character and his role as a philosopher.

  5. The teacher will then transition the discussion towards how Franklin's philosophical beliefs might have influenced his role as a statesman, scientist, and inventor.

Activity 2: Kite Experiment (10 - 12 minutes)

  1. The teacher will explain the famous kite experiment conducted by Franklin in 1752. Emphasize the intent of the experiment was to prove that lightning was electricity.

  2. Each group will be provided with materials necessary for a simplified version of the experiment: a small kite made out of a plastic bag, a string, and a small key.

  3. The teacher will guide the students in setting up the kite experiment, ensuring safety precautions are in place. Students will be asked to predict what they think will happen when the kite is flown in stormy weather.

  4. Following the setup, the teacher will guide students to fly the kite in a manner that allows it to come into contact with an electrical source (e.g., an electrical power line). The teacher will then ask students to observe and record any changes they see.

  5. After the experiment, each group will be given time to discuss their observations and draw conclusions. The teacher will then facilitate a class discussion where students share their observations and conclusions, comparing them to Franklin's original experiment.

Activity 3: Franklin's Inventions (5 - 6 minutes)

  1. The teacher will ask students to reflect on the importance of Franklin's inventions in their daily lives.

  2. Each group will be given a list of Franklin's inventions, such as the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove.

  3. The groups will discuss and make a list of these inventions that they believe have had the most significant impact on society. They will also note any specific ways these inventions have influenced their own lives.

  4. After the discussion, each group will share their list with the class, and the teacher will lead a discussion about the students' choices and their reasoning.

By the end of the development stage, students should have a deeper understanding of Franklin's life and work, and they should be able to draw connections between his contributions and their own lives and society at large. The hands-on activities should have provided a fun and engaging way for students to interact with the material and deepen their learning.

Feedback (8 - 10 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Facilitate a group discussion where each group shares their main findings or conclusions from the activities. Each group will have up to 3 minutes to present, ensuring that the discussion remains focused and within the time limit. This will allow students to learn from each other's perspectives and insights.

  2. Connect the group's findings to the broader context of Benjamin Franklin's life and work. The teacher will highlight how the activities link to Franklin's role as a statesman, scientist, inventor, and writer, and how his contributions have shaped American society and history.

  3. Encourage students to reflect on the day's activities. The teacher can ask questions such as:

    • "What was the most important concept you learned today?"

    • "Which of Benjamin Franklin's contributions do you find most remarkable and why?"

    • "How do you think Franklin's philosophy of practical wisdom has influenced his scientific and inventing pursuits?"

    • "Can you think of any modern-day polymaths who are making significant contributions in multiple fields?"

  4. Provide students with a minute or two to think about these questions and share their thoughts. This reflection time will help consolidate their learning and internalize the key concepts.

  5. Facilitate a whole-class discussion where students share their reflections. The teacher will also share their own reflections on the day's lesson, reinforcing the key points and addressing any misconceptions.

  6. Conclude the feedback session by summarizing the key learning points from the lesson. The teacher will also explain how the lesson's activities and discussions have helped to deepen students' understanding of Benjamin Franklin's life and contributions.

By the end of the feedback stage, students should have a clear understanding of the day's lesson, be able to articulate their thoughts on the subject matter, and have a deeper appreciation for Benjamin Franklin's significance in American history. The teacher should also have a good sense of the students' learning progress and be able to identify any areas that may require further clarification or reinforcement in future lessons.

Conclusion (5 - 7 minutes)

The teacher will:

  1. Summarize and Recap the Lesson:

    • The teacher will recap the main points of the lesson, emphasizing Benjamin Franklin's multifaceted contributions as a statesman, scientist, inventor, and writer.
    • The teacher will remind students of the activities they engaged in, such as analyzing quotes from 'Poor Richard's Almanack', conducting a simplified version of Franklin's kite experiment, and discussing his inventions.
    • The teacher will also recap the key insights gained from the activities, such as Franklin's practical wisdom, his curiosity and love for learning, and his significant contributions to society and history.
  2. Connection to Theory and Practice:

    • The teacher will explain how the lesson connected theoretical knowledge with practical applications. For instance, students learned about Franklin's philosophical beliefs through analyzing his quotes, and they understood the scientific method through the kite experiment.
    • The teacher will also highlight how the lesson fostered critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as students had to interpret quotes, make predictions for the kite experiment, and assess the impact of Franklin's inventions.
  3. Suggested Additional Materials:

    • The teacher will recommend additional resources for students interested in learning more about Benjamin Franklin. These resources can include biographies, documentaries, and interactive websites.
    • The teacher will also suggest that students explore Franklin's other inventions, beyond the ones discussed in class, and his role in the formation of the U.S. Constitution and the American Philosophical Society.
  4. Importance of the Topic for Everyday Life:

    • Finally, the teacher will explain the relevance of Benjamin Franklin's life and work to students' everyday lives. The teacher will stress that Franklin's example of a lifelong learner and a problem solver can inspire students in their own academic and personal pursuits.
    • The teacher will also highlight the significance of Franklin's inventions, such as the lightning rod and bifocals, in modern life, and how his contributions to the postal system have influenced global communication and commerce.

By the end of the conclusion, students should have a comprehensive understanding of Benjamin Franklin's life and work, feel motivated to further explore the topic, and recognize the relevance of Franklin's contributions in their own lives and the world around them.

See more
Discipline logo

History

The French Revolution

Objectives (5 - 7 minutes)

  1. To understand the causes and effects of the French Revolution: Students will be able to identify and explain the underlying causes of the French Revolution, including economic, social, and political factors. They will also explore and discuss the significant impacts and consequences of the revolution on French society and the world at large.

  2. To analyze primary and secondary sources related to the French Revolution: Students will develop their skills in historical analysis by examining a range of authentic texts, images, and artifacts from the period. They will learn how to extract relevant information, identify bias, and draw their own conclusions from these sources.

  3. To foster critical thinking and discussion: Through collaborative activities and classroom discussions, students will enhance their ability to critically evaluate historical events and their implications. They will also develop their communication skills by expressing their thoughts and ideas in a respectful and constructive manner.

  4. To connect the French Revolution with modern-day concepts: Students will be encouraged to make connections between the French Revolution and contemporary issues and events. This will help them to see the relevance and ongoing impact of historical events in the present day.

Introduction (10 - 12 minutes)

  1. Review of Necessary Content: The teacher begins the lesson by reminding the students about the main concepts of the Enlightenment Period, which preceded the French Revolution. This includes the ideas of equality, liberty, and fraternity, which were significant factors in sparking the revolution. The teacher also reviews the basic structure of French society at the time, emphasizing the drastic disparities between the three estates.

  2. Problem Situations:

    • The teacher presents a scenario where the students are divided into three groups, representing the three estates of French society. The first estate, the clergy, and the second estate, the nobility, are given the majority of the resources, while the third estate, the commoners, are given only a few. The teacher then asks, "What would the third estate do if they felt this division was unfair?"
    • The teacher introduces a second problem by presenting a situation where the king of France is making decisions that benefit the first and second estates but hurt the third estate. The teacher asks, "How could the third estate gain more power and influence to protect their rights and interests?"
  3. Contextualization of the Subject: The teacher then explains how the French Revolution was a turning point in world history, leading to the end of the monarchy in France and the rise of modern ideologies such as democracy and nationalism. The teacher also highlights the ongoing relevance of the revolution's ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity in today's world.

  4. Engaging the Students' Interest:

    • The teacher shares a fascinating fact about the French Revolution, such as the invention of the guillotine or the role of women's clubs in the revolution, to grab the students' attention.
    • The teacher shows a short, animated video clip that simplifies the complex events of the French Revolution, making it more engaging and accessible for the students.
  5. Introduction of the Topic:

    • The teacher formally introduces the topic of the French Revolution, explaining that they will be delving into the causes, events, and impacts of this pivotal historical event. The teacher also emphasizes that understanding the French Revolution will help the students to better comprehend the development of modern political ideologies and systems.
  6. Overview of the Lesson:

    • The teacher outlines the structure of the lesson, explaining that the first part will involve the students learning the basics of the French Revolution at home, through reading materials and videos, and the second part will take place in the classroom, with the students engaging in active learning activities and discussions. The teacher assures the students that they will have plenty of opportunities to ask questions and clarify their understanding during the in-class activities.

Development

Pre-Class Activities (15 - 20 minutes)

  1. Reading Assignments: The teacher assigns the students two articles for reading at home. The first article simplifies the causes and major events of the French Revolution, while the second article explores the long-term impacts and legacy of the revolution. The articles should be written in a student-friendly language to ensure easy comprehension.

  2. Video Viewing: The students are provided with a link to an engaging educational video that covers the French Revolution. The video should be no longer than 20 minutes, and it should have interesting visuals and a clear narrative to aid understanding.

  3. Note-taking: The students are encouraged to take notes while reading the articles and watching the video. These notes will be used in the classroom for discussions and activities. To ensure the students are focused on the key points, they are given a guiding question: "What were the main causes, events, and impacts of the French Revolution?"

  4. Online Quiz: After completing the readings and video, the students are required to take a short online quiz designed to gauge their understanding of the French Revolution. The quiz is meant to be a self-assessment tool, and it should not be graded. The teacher will review the quiz results to identify any areas of confusion or misunderstanding to address during the in-class session.

In-Class Activities (20 - 25 minutes)

Activity 1: "Revolutionary Role-Play"

  1. Introduction: The teacher divides the class into groups of five – each representing a different faction in the French Revolution: the First Estate (Clergy), the Second Estate (Nobility), the Third Estate (Commoners), the Monarchy, and the Revolutionary Forces (Jacobins, Sans-Culottes, etc.). The teacher explains that the goal is to simulate the events leading up to the French Revolution and its major phases, while also exploring the different perspectives and motivations of each faction.

  2. Role Cards: The teacher hands out role cards to each group, which provide them with a brief overview of their faction's position, interests, and grievances. The students are given a few minutes to read and discuss their roles.

  3. Discussion and Negotiation: The teacher prompts the groups to discuss and negotiate their positions, trying to find a peaceful solution to their conflicts. They are encouraged to use the knowledge they gained from the pre-class activities to inform their arguments.

  4. Revolution Begins: The teacher starts the role-play, setting off a "crisis" (e.g., economic downturn, crop failure, a war), which then sparks tensions among the groups. The students are prompted to react based on their assigned roles.

  5. Assessment of the Role-Play: After the role-play, the teacher facilitates a discussion where each group shares their experiences, insights, and the decisions they made. The teacher also provides feedback on the students' understanding of the French Revolution and how well they incorporated their knowledge into the role-play.

Activity 2: "Revolutionary Pictionary"

  1. Introduction: The teacher explains that the class will now take part in a drawing game that will help them visualize and remember key events and figures from the French Revolution.

  2. Materials and Rules: Each group is given a stack of cards, each card containing a word or phrase related to the French Revolution – such as "Bastille," "Robespierre," or "Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen." One member of each group then draws a card and tries to get their teammates to guess the word or phrase by drawing it on a whiteboard.

  3. Guessing and Learning: The other members of the group try to guess the word or phrase based on the drawing. The teacher encourages the students to discuss the drawings and the answers, reinforcing their learning and understanding of the French Revolution.

  4. Review and Discussion: After each round, the teacher reviews the correct answers, explains the significance of the terms, and addresses any questions or misconceptions. This ensures that all students have a solid understanding of the events and concepts of the French Revolution.

By the end of these activities, students should have a comprehensive understanding of the French Revolution, its causes, its key figures and events, and its long-term impacts. The interactive and collaborative nature of these activities will also foster critical thinking and communication skills among the students.

Feedback (8 - 10 minutes)

  1. Group Discussions: The teacher facilitates a group discussion, where each group is given up to 3 minutes to share the solutions or conclusions they arrived at during the activities. This includes the decisions made during the "Revolutionary Role-Play" and the drawings and explanations in the "Revolutionary Pictionary." The teacher encourages all students to participate in the discussions, fostering an inclusive and collaborative learning environment.

  2. Linking Theory and Practice: After each group has shared, the teacher takes a few minutes to connect the outcomes of the activities with the theoretical knowledge of the French Revolution. The teacher highlights how the actions and decisions made in the activities reflect the real-life events and dynamics of the revolution. This step helps solidify the students' understanding of the subject and its relevance.

  3. Reflection Time: The teacher then prompts the students to take a moment to reflect on the day's lesson. They are encouraged to consider the following questions:

    • "What was the most important concept you learned today?"
    • "Which questions do you still have about the French Revolution?"
    • "How can you relate the French Revolution to current events or issues?"
  4. Sharing Reflections: The teacher invites a few students to share their reflections with the class. This provides an opportunity for the students to learn from each other's perspectives and to hear different connections between the French Revolution and the modern world.

  5. Addressing Remaining Questions: The teacher addresses any remaining questions or misunderstandings about the French Revolution. If there are complex questions that cannot be answered immediately, the teacher assures the students that these will be addressed in the next class or through further research.

  6. Summarizing the Lesson: The teacher concludes the feedback session by summarizing the key points of the lesson and expressing appreciation for the students' active participation and engagement. The teacher also encourages the students to continue exploring the French Revolution and its impacts beyond the classroom.

Through this feedback stage, the students will have the chance to reflect on their learning, to learn from their peers, and to receive clarification on any points of confusion. This will help to consolidate their knowledge and understanding of the French Revolution, and it will also provide valuable insights for the teacher to adjust and improve future lessons.

Conclusion (5 - 7 minutes)

  1. Recap of the Lesson: The teacher starts by summarizing the main contents of the lesson. They remind the students of the causes and effects of the French Revolution, highlighting the role of the Enlightenment Period, the economic and social disparities in French society, and the revolutionary ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity. The teacher also revisits the in-class activities, emphasizing the key insights and learnings gained from the "Revolutionary Role-Play" and the "Revolutionary Pictionary."

  2. Linking Theory, Practice, and Applications: The teacher then explains how the lesson connected theoretical knowledge with practical activities. They highlight how the pre-class readings and video provided the theoretical foundation, which was then applied and explored in the in-class activities. They also note how the activities allowed the students to not only understand the French Revolution but also to apply their knowledge in a fun and engaging way. Additionally, the teacher mentions how the lesson connected historical events with contemporary issues and events, demonstrating the application and relevance of historical knowledge in the modern world.

  3. Additional Materials: The teacher suggests additional materials for the students who wish to delve deeper into the French Revolution. This includes books, documentaries, and online resources that provide more detailed and comprehensive information about the revolution. The teacher also recommends a few historical novels and movies that can help the students to better understand the human side of the revolution and its impacts on ordinary people's lives.

  4. Relevance of the French Revolution: The teacher concludes the lesson by emphasizing the significance of the French Revolution in shaping the modern world. They explain that the French Revolution not only ended the monarchy in France but also laid the foundation for modern political ideologies and systems, such as democracy and nationalism. They also stress that the revolution's ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity continue to inspire and influence political and social movements worldwide. Lastly, they remind the students that studying the past, like the French Revolution, can help us understand the present and make informed decisions about the future.

  5. Closing Remarks: The teacher ends the lesson by thanking the students for their active participation and engagement. They also encourage the students to continue exploring the French Revolution and its impacts outside of the classroom, and to always keep questioning and learning about the world around them.

See more
Save time with Teachy!
With Teachy, you have access to:
Classes and contents
Automatic grading
Assignments, questions and materials
Personalized feedback
Teachy Mascot
BR flagUS flag
Terms of usePrivacy PolicyCookies Policy

2023 - All rights reserved

Follow us
on social media
Instagram LogoLinkedIn LogoTwitter Logo