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Project of Ancient Rome: Monarchy & Repuplic

Contextualization

Introduction to Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome is one of the most influential and fascinating civilizations in world history. From its humble beginnings as a small village on the Tiber River, Rome grew to become an empire that spanned three continents – Europe, Africa, and Asia – and lasted for more than a thousand years. This project will delve into two key periods of Roman history: the Monarchy and the Republic.

The Roman Monarchy

The Roman Monarchy period is the earliest period of Rome's history. This period is characterized by the rule of seven kings, who are believed to have reigned for a total of 244 years. Little is known about this period, and most of what we do know comes from legends and myths. However, it was during this time that Rome began to expand its territory and build the foundations of its future power.

The Roman Republic

The Roman Republic period marked a significant shift in Roman governance. It began in 509 BCE, when the Romans overthrew their last king and established a system of government in which power was held by the people and their elected representatives. The Republic was characterized by a complex system of checks and balances, which aimed to prevent any one individual or group from gaining too much power. This period saw the rise of the Roman Senate, a governing body composed of wealthy and influential citizens, and the Roman Army, which played a crucial role in Rome's territorial expansion.

Why is this important?

The study of the Roman Monarchy and Republic is important for several reasons. Firstly, it helps us understand the origins of many of our modern political and legal systems. The Romans were masterful administrators and lawmakers, and many of their ideas and institutions have had a lasting impact on Western civilization.

Secondly, the transition from monarchy to republic is a fascinating case study in political change and revolution. It shows us that even the most entrenched and seemingly unassailable forms of government can be overthrown by determined and organized opposition, and that power is ultimately in the hands of the people.

Finally, the story of Rome is a cautionary tale about the dangers of unchecked power and the erosion of democratic values. The Republic's downfall was brought about, in part, by the rise of powerful individuals who subverted the democratic process for their own gain. This is a lesson that is just as relevant today as it was two thousand years ago.

Resources

To conduct research on the topics, we have compiled the following resources:

  1. Ancient Rome - History: A comprehensive overview of Ancient Rome, including its Monarchy and Republic periods.
  2. The Roman Monarchy - Ancient History Encyclopedia: Detailed information about the Roman Monarchy period, including its seven kings.
  3. The Roman Republic - Ancient History Encyclopedia: A comprehensive resource on the Roman Republic, including its political structure and key events.
  4. The Romans - BBC: Interactive resources on a wide range of topics related to Ancient Rome.
  5. Rome: A History in Seven Sackings by Matthew Kneale: A book that provides a detailed account of Rome's history, including its Monarchy and Republic periods.
  6. Ancient Rome for Kids - Ducksters: A fun and engaging resource for kids, with information and activities on Ancient Rome.

These resources should provide a good starting point for your research. However, don't limit yourself to just these sources. Feel free to explore other books, articles, and websites to deepen your understanding of this fascinating period in human history.

Practical Activity

Activity Title: "Recreating Ancient Rome: A Journey through the Monarchy and Republic Periods"

Objective of the Project:

The main objective of this project is to recreate the key aspects of Ancient Rome's Monarchy and Republic periods, fostering a deeper understanding of the historical context, political systems, and societal norms during each period. Furthermore, this project aims to enhance collaboration and communication skills among the students, while also promoting creativity and problem-solving abilities.

Detailed Description of the Project:

In groups of 3 to 5, students will be tasked with recreating two significant events from each of the periods – Monarchy and Republic – in Ancient Rome. For each event, students will have to:

  1. Research and understand the historical context, key figures, and the significance of the event.
  2. Develop a script or storyboard for a short skit or documentary that accurately depicts the event.
  3. Create props, costumes, and/or visual aids to enhance the presentation.
  4. Present the skit or documentary to the class, followed by a debriefing discussion.

The project duration is four to six weeks, where students will spend approximately 10-12 hours per week on research, planning, creating, and rehearsing. This project will require not only historical research but also artistic skills, teamwork, and time management.

Necessary Materials:

  1. Access to the selected resources for research.
  2. Art supplies for creating props and costumes.
  3. Video recording equipment (optional, for documenting the skit).

Detailed Step-by-Step for Carrying out the Activity:

Step 1: Formation of Groups and Selection of Events (Week 1)

Form groups of 3 to 5 students. Each group should choose four significant events in Ancient Rome – two from the Monarchy period and two from the Republic period. The chosen events should be diverse in nature and should not overlap with the events chosen by other groups.

Step 2: Research and Understanding of the Chosen Events (Week 1 - Week 2)

Using the provided resources and additional research, students will thoroughly study each of the chosen events. They should strive for a comprehensive understanding of the historical context, the key figures involved, and the significance of each event.

Step 3: Script or Storyboard Development (Week 2 - Week 3)

Based on their research, students will create a script or storyboard for each event. The script should accurately represent the event and the character's roles, while the storyboard should visually depict the sequence of events.

Step 4: Creation of Props and Costumes (Week 3 - Week 4)

Using their artistic skills, students will create props and costumes needed for the skits or documentaries. This step may require collaboration with other groups if the props or costumes are too complex for a single group to create.

Step 5: Rehearsals and Documentation (Week 4 - Week 5)

Students will rehearse their skits or documentaries multiple times to ensure a smooth performance. If possible, the performance should be recorded. This will serve as a reference for the debriefing discussion and for creating the final documentation of the project.

Step 6: Presentation and Debriefing (Week 5 - Week 6)

Each group will present their skits or documentaries to the class, followed by a debriefing discussion. The discussion should cover the historical accuracy of the presentation, the challenges faced during the project, and the lessons learned.

Project Deliverables:

Each group will be required to submit a written report at the end of the project. The report should contain the following sections:

  1. Introduction: A brief overview of the chosen events, their significance, and the objective of the project.
  2. Development: Detailed description of the research conducted, the process of creating the skits or documentaries, and the findings from the debriefing discussion.
  3. Conclusion: A reflection on the project, including the learned concepts, the gained skills, and the overall experience of recreating Ancient Rome.
  4. Bibliography: A list of all sources used for research.

The report should be well-structured, providing a clear connection between the chosen events, the research, the process of creating the skits or documentaries, and the learnings obtained. The report should also be written in a language that is suitable for academic purposes, demonstrating a clear understanding of the historical events and the project objectives.

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History

Industrial Revolution

Contextualization

Introduction to the Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution, a period of rapid industrialization from the 18th to the 19th century, brought about profound changes in society, economy, and culture. This period marked a shift from manual labor to mechanization through the use of increasingly sophisticated machinery in factories. It also witnessed the emergence of new socio-economic systems, such as capitalism and socialism.

The Industrial Revolution began in Great Britain and subsequently spread to the rest of the world, including the United States, Europe, and parts of Asia. The innovations and technologies that were developed during this era, such as the steam engine, the spinning jenny, and the power loom, revolutionized production methods and led to significant improvements in the standard of living for many.

However, the Industrial Revolution was not without its downsides. The rapid urbanization and mass migration to cities that accompanied industrialization resulted in overcrowding, poor sanitation, and widespread poverty. The working conditions in factories were often dangerous and exploitative, leading to the rise of labor movements and the establishment of worker rights.

Importance and Relevance of the Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution was a pivotal moment in human history, and its effects continue to shape the world we live in today. The innovations and technologies that were developed during this period laid the groundwork for the modern industrial and technological society.

The Industrial Revolution also had a profound impact on culture and society. It led to the rise of a new middle class and the decline of the traditional aristocracy. It also brought about significant social changes, such as the increasing role of women in the workforce and the growth of cities and urban culture.

Understanding the Industrial Revolution is therefore essential for understanding the world we live in today. It helps us to understand how our modern industrial and technological society came into being, and the social, economic, and environmental impacts of this transformation.

Resources

  1. BBC Bitesize: The Industrial Revolution
  2. History.com: Industrial Revolution
  3. Khan Academy: The Industrial Revolution
  4. National Geographic: Industrial Revolution
  5. Book: "The Industrial Revolution: A Very Short Introduction" by Robert C. Allen

Practical Activity

Activity Title: The Industrial Revolution - A Journey Through Time and Change

Objective of the Project:

The objective of this project is to provide an in-depth understanding of the Industrial Revolution, its causes, effects, and significant changes, through a creative and interactive approach. This will involve research, collaboration, and the development of a visual timeline that showcases the key events and innovations during this period.

Detailed Description of the Project:

In this project, each group of 3-5 students will research and create a visual timeline that illustrates the key events, innovations, and societal changes that occurred during the Industrial Revolution. The timeline should be accompanied by written descriptions that provide context and detail for each significant development.

The project will be divided into the following phases:

  1. Research Phase: Students will conduct research on the Industrial Revolution using the provided resources and additional sources that they find credible. They should focus on understanding the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution and identify the key innovations and societal changes that took place during this period.

  2. Timeline Creation Phase: Based on their research, students will create a visual timeline that shows the chronological order of the key events and developments during the Industrial Revolution. The timeline should include images and descriptions for each event or development.

  3. Description Writing Phase: Students will write detailed descriptions for each event or development on the timeline. These descriptions should provide context, explain the significance of each event or development, and discuss its impact on society, economy, and culture during the Industrial Revolution and beyond.

  4. Group Discussion and Review Phase: Students will review each other's work in a group discussion. They will provide feedback and suggestions and make any necessary revisions to their timeline or descriptions based on the discussion.

Necessary Materials:

  • Internet access for research
  • Access to a computer with presentation software for creating the timeline (e.g., Microsoft PowerPoint, Google Slides, or any other timeline creation tool)
  • Writing materials for drafting and finalizing the descriptions

Detailed Step-by-Step for Carrying Out the Activity:

  1. Formation of Groups and Topic Allocation (1 hour): Divide the students into groups of 3-5 and assign each group the task of understanding and presenting a different aspect of the Industrial Revolution. For example, one group could focus on the technological innovations, another on the social changes, and so on.

  2. Research (3-4 hours): In this phase, each group will conduct research on their assigned topic. Students should use a variety of sources, including the provided resources and additional sources that they find credible. They should take notes during their research to help them in the next phases.

  3. Timeline Creation (2-3 hours): Based on their research, each group will create a visual timeline that shows the chronological order of the key events and developments related to their assigned topic. The timeline should include images and descriptions for each event or development.

  4. Description Writing (1-2 hours): Students will write detailed descriptions for each event or development on the timeline. These descriptions should provide context, explain the significance of each event or development, and discuss its impact on society, economy, and culture during the Industrial Revolution and beyond.

  5. Group Discussion and Review (1 hour): Each group will review each other's work in a group discussion. They will provide feedback and suggestions and make any necessary revisions to their timeline or descriptions based on the discussion.

  6. Project Submission (30 minutes): Each group will submit their final timeline and descriptions along with a written report detailing their research, the process of creating the timeline, and the conclusions drawn from their work.

Project Deliverables:

The final deliverables of the project will include:

  • A visual timeline that showcases the key events, innovations, and societal changes during the Industrial Revolution.

  • Detailed descriptions for each event or development on the timeline.

  • A written report in the format of an introduction, development, conclusion, and bibliography.

    • The Introduction should provide an overview of the Industrial Revolution, its relevance, the objective of the project, and a brief description of the timeline and descriptions created by the group.

    • The Development section should detail the theoretical background of the Industrial Revolution, the methodology used in the project (i.e., how the research was conducted, how the timeline and descriptions were created, and how the group reviewed each other's work), and finally, it should present and discuss the findings (i.e., the key events, innovations, and societal changes during the Industrial Revolution).

    • The Conclusion should revisit the main points of the project, explicitly stating the learnings obtained and the conclusions drawn about the Industrial Revolution based on the work done.

    • The Bibliography should list all the sources used for the research and creation of the timeline and descriptions.

Remember, the purpose of the project is not only to assess your knowledge of the Industrial Revolution but also to enhance your research, collaboration, creativity, and presentation skills. Good luck!

Project Duration:

The project is expected to take a total of 8-12 hours per student to complete, and the total duration of the project would be one month, including research, timeline creation, description writing, group discussion, and report writing. This duration provides ample time for thorough research, thoughtful creation of the timeline and descriptions, and a comprehensive review process.

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History

Classic Greece

Contextualization

Introduction

Welcome to the project on Classic Greece, a period in history that has laid the foundation for the democratic principles, philosophy, literature, and arts that we enjoy today. This era, known as the "Golden Age" of Greece, spans from the 5th to the 4th centuries BCE.

In this project, we will be exploring the core elements of Classical Greece, including its political structure, notable philosophers, significant historical events, cultural contributions, and the daily life of its citizens. We will delve into topics like the birth of democracy, the teachings of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, the Persian Wars, the Peloponnesian War, and the Olympics, just to name a few.

Greece, in particular, the city-state of Athens, forms the basis of much of our modern societies. It was a hub of intellectual and artistic innovations, where ideas were shared and debated, and where the foundations of Western philosophy, literature, and art were laid.

Importance of Classic Greece

Understanding Classic Greece is more than just a study of the past; it's a key to understanding present-day society. The concepts, philosophies, and forms of government that originated in this period still resonate in our world today.

The birth of democracy in Athens is especially significant. It introduced the idea that people should have a say in how they are governed, an idea that has shaped many modern governments. The teachings of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle laid the groundwork for Western philosophy and continue to influence our thoughts on ethics, politics, and the nature of reality.

The cultural contributions of Classic Greece are also profound. From the epics of Homer to the dramas of Sophocles, from the sculptures of Phidias to the temples of the Acropolis, these achievements continue to inspire and influence our art and literature.

Resources

To guide your exploration of Classic Greece, I recommend the following resources:

  1. Ancient Greece - History, mythology, art, war, culture, society, and architecture
  2. BBC Bitesize - Ancient Greece
  3. Khan Academy - Ancient Greece
  4. The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Ancient Greece
  5. Crash Course - World History: The Greeks

These resources provide a comprehensive overview of Classic Greece and will help you delve deeper into its different aspects.

Practical Activity

Activity Title: "Journey through Classic Greece: An Interactive Timeline"

Objective of the Project

The main objective of this project is to create an interactive timeline that not only highlights the significant events and contributions of Classic Greece but also offers an immersive experience of the period. This will require the integration of historical research, creative design, and technological skills.

Detailed Description of the Project

In groups of 3 to 5, students will:

  1. Conduct in-depth research on the major events, influential figures, cultural contributions, and daily life in Classic Greece. This should cover a span of 100 years, from 500 BCE to 400 BCE.
  2. Create a digital timeline using a platform of their choice (e.g., Timeline JS, Prezi, Sutori, etc.), incorporating their research findings, images, videos, and interactive elements.
  3. Write a script for a "tour guide" who will narrate the timeline, providing historical context and interesting facts about each event.
  4. Record a voice-over of the tour guide script, syncing it with the timeline to create a dynamic presentation.
  5. Present their timeline to the class, leading the class on a virtual tour of Classic Greece.

The timeline should be structured in chronological order, and each event should be accompanied by a short description, relevant images or videos, and an explanation of its significance.

Necessary Materials

  1. Access to research materials (books, online resources, etc.)
  2. A computer with internet access for each group.
  3. Digital timeline creation platform (Timeline JS, Prezi, Sutori, etc.)
  4. Audio recording and editing software (Audacity, GarageBand, etc.)
  5. A projector or large screen for the presentation.

Detailed Step-by-Step for Carrying Out the Activity

  1. Research (Approximately 2 hours): Each group should divide the research topics among themselves and conduct thorough research on Classic Greece, focusing on the key events, influential figures, cultural contributions, and daily life.

  2. Timeline Creation (Approximately 3 hours): After the research, the group should decide on the structure and design of their timeline. They should then populate it with their findings, ensuring each event is accompanied by a brief description, relevant images or videos, and an explanation of its significance.

  3. Script Writing (Approximately 1 hour): The group should now write a script for the "tour guide" who will be leading the class through the timeline. The script should provide historical context and interesting facts about each event.

  4. Audio Recording (Approximately 1 hour): The group should record a voice-over of the tour guide script. They may use audio recording and editing software to enhance the audio quality if available.

  5. Presentation (Approximately 1 hour): The group should present their timeline to the class, leading the class on a virtual tour of Classic Greece. They should explain the events, their significance, and any interesting facts they found during their research.

Project Deliverables

At the end of the project, each group will submit a written document and the digital timeline.

The written document should follow the structure of an academic paper:

  1. Introduction: Briefly explain the importance of Classic Greece and the objective of your project.
  2. Development: Detail the theory behind Classic Greece, describe the activities carried out in the project, explain the methodology used, and finally present and discuss the results obtained.
  3. Conclusions: Revisit the main points of your project, state what you've learned about Classic Greece, and discuss any insights or conclusions you have drawn from the project.
  4. Bibliography: List all the resources you used during your research.

The digital timeline should be a comprehensive and engaging representation of Classic Greece. It should be clear, easy to navigate, and visually appealing. The inclusion of interactive elements (e.g., quizzes, games, etc.) is highly encouraged.

Conclusion and Grading Criteria

This project is designed to assess your understanding of Classic Greece, your ability to work in a team, your research and presentation skills, and your creativity in designing an interactive learning experience.

Grading will be based on:

  1. The depth and accuracy of your research.
  2. The organization and clarity of your timeline.
  3. The creativity and educational value of your interactive elements.
  4. The clarity and enthusiasm of your presentation.
  5. The quality and coherence of your written document.

This project will not only deepen your knowledge of Classic Greece but also improve your collaboration, creativity, research, and presentation skills. Enjoy your journey through Classic Greece!

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History

Voyages of Exploration

Contextualization

Voyages of Exploration have shaped the world we live in today. These journeys, motivated by economic, political, and religious factors, have had profound impacts on societies, cultures, and the exchange of knowledge. Beginning in the 15th century, European explorers set sail to search for new trade routes, resources, and to spread their influence across the globe. Their voyages not only transformed the map but also had significant consequences for the peoples they encountered, and for those who sent them.

The Age of Exploration, also known as the Age of Discovery, was an exciting and often dangerous period in history. This period saw European navigators travel around the world, opening up new lands and cultures to exploration and colonization. The first wave of exploration began in the late 1400s with Christopher Columbus' voyage to the Americas and Vasco da Gama's journey to India, facilitated by the development of advanced navigational tools and technologies.

These voyages led to the establishment of vast colonial empires, the forced migration and enslavement of millions of people, and the exchange of goods, ideas, and diseases between the Old World (Europe, Asia, and Africa) and the New World (the Americas). They also set the stage for the development of global trade networks, the spread of European languages and religions, and the scientific and cultural revolutions that would follow.

Resources

For a better understanding of the topic and to prepare for the project, you can use the following resources:

  1. Book: The Age of Exploration: From Christopher Columbus to Ferdinand Magellan by John Perritano.
  2. Website: The Mariners' Museum. This online resource offers a comprehensive look at the Age of Exploration, including interactive maps, primary source documents, and detailed biographies of key figures.
  3. Video: Crash Course World History: The Voyages of Zheng He. This engaging video explores the voyages of the Chinese explorer Zheng He, a contemporary of Christopher Columbus.
  4. Documentary: The Age of Exploration: The History and Legacy of the Explorers Who Transformed the World and Charted the Unknown. This documentary series provides a detailed and visually stunning exploration of the Age of Exploration.
  5. Museum: The British Museum. The British Museum's online collection includes artifacts from the Age of Exploration, providing a tangible look at the goods and technologies that were exchanged during this period.

Practical Activity

Activity Title: "Mapping the Age of Exploration: A Global Journey of Discovery"

Objective of the Project:

The goal of this project is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the voyages of exploration from the 15th to the 17th centuries, their causes, effects, and the key figures involved. This will be achieved through a creative, collaborative, and in-depth exploration of these voyages, resulting in the creation of a detailed map, an informative report, and an engaging presentation.

Detailed Description of the Project:

This project will be conducted in groups of 3 to 5 students and will require a time commitment of at least 12 hours per student over the course of one month. Students will be tasked with researching, mapping, and presenting on a specific voyage or group of voyages from the Age of Exploration. The project will culminate in a detailed report, a hand-drawn or digital map, and a 10-minute multimedia presentation.

Necessary Materials:

  • Access to the school or local library for research.
  • Art supplies for map creation (if opting for a hand-drawn map).
  • Digital resources (such as Google Slides, Canva, or Adobe Spark) for report and presentation creation.
  • Reliable internet access for research and collaboration.

Step-by-step for Carrying Out the Activity:

  1. Research Phase (4 hours): Each group will select a specific voyage or group of voyages to research. This should include the reasons for the voyage, the key figures involved, the routes taken, the encounters with indigenous peoples, and the impacts of the voyage(s) on both the Old and New Worlds. Use the provided resources and any other reliable sources you find during your research.

  2. Mapping Phase (2 hours): Using the information gathered in the research phase, create a detailed map of the voyage(s). This can be a hand-drawn map or a digital map created using an online tool. Include key geographical features, the route(s) taken, and any significant encounters or events that occurred during the voyage(s).

  3. Report Writing Phase (4 hours): Based on your research and map creation, write a detailed report (approximately 1500-2000 words) that explains the voyage(s) in depth. This report should include an introduction, where you explain the purpose of the voyage(s) and their historical context, a development section, where you detail the voyage(s), and a conclusion, where you summarize the main points and discuss the impacts of the voyage(s).

  4. Presentation Creation Phase (2 hours): Create a 10-minute multimedia presentation (such as a PowerPoint or video) that summarizes your research, map, and report. Be creative and engaging in your presentation - use images, videos, and other visual aids to help tell your story.

  5. Presentation Phase (Approximately 30 minutes per group): Each group will present their project to the class. Be prepared to answer questions and engage in a discussion about your voyage(s) and your project.

  6. Reflection Phase (1 hour): After all groups have presented, each group will participate in a class-wide discussion about the voyages of exploration. Reflect on what you learned from the project and how it deepened your understanding of the topic.

Project Deliverables:

Each group will submit the following:

  1. A detailed report (1500-2000 words) covering all aspects of their chosen voyage(s) of exploration.

  2. A hand-drawn or digital map(s) of their chosen voyage(s) of exploration.

  3. A 10-minute multimedia presentation summarizing their research, map, and report.

Project Grading Criteria:

The project will be graded based on the following criteria:

  1. Content (40%): Accuracy and depth of the research, understanding of the historical context and significance of the voyage(s), and the quality of the information presented in the report and map.

  2. Creativity (20%): Originality and creativity in the map design and the presentation of the report.

  3. Collaboration (20%): Effective communication and collaboration within the group, demonstrated through the quality of the report and the presentation.

  4. Presentation Skills (20%): Quality of the delivery of the presentation, including public speaking skills, use of visual aids, and ability to answer questions.

Remember, the goal of this project is not only to deepen your understanding of the voyages of exploration but also to develop your research, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills. Good luck and have fun exploring the world!

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